Skip to contentContribute to ReadWriteThink / RSS / FAQs / Site Demonstrations / Contact Us / About Us

 

 

Contribute to ReadWriteThink

ReadWriteThink couldn't publish all of this great content without literacy experts to write and review for us. If you've got lessons plans, activities, or other ideas you'd like to contribute, we'd love to hear from you.

More

 

Professional Development

Find the latest in professional publications, learn new techniques and strategies, and find out how you can connect with other literacy professionals.

More

 

Reading & Language Arts Community

Did You Know?

Your students can save their work with Student Interactives.

More more

Home Classroom Resources Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing

E-mail / Share / Print This Page / Print All Materials (Note: Handouts must be printed separately)

 

Exploring Plagiarism, Copyright, and Paraphrasing

Grades 6 – 8
Lesson Plan Type Standard Lesson
Estimated Time Three 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Maria Kardick

Collegeville, Pennsylvania

Publisher

National Council of Teachers of English

 

Published Comments

Post a Comment

Send Us Feedback

 

  • Published Comments

Nancy Jimenez

September 20, 2012

Maybe we could have the students have an online discussion of the scenarios through a blog?

 

Christine

February 28, 2011

I agree that an answer sheet would not be appropriate for this lesson, as these examples lend themselves to discussion. There aren't right/wrong answers but multiple issues to consider, such as how to paraphrase well, what is "common knowledge," when does one use a citation, and so on. I encourage teachers to consider collaborating or team teaching this with their school librarian, who has education and background knowledge in these areas.

 

Ben Reynolds

November 24, 2010

Just disagreeing with Jenni and Carol that an answer sheet would be good. It wouldn't. What would be good, I think, would be a demo discussion of one of the paraphrases that may or may not be plagiarism to give us all a sense of where the line is likely to be.

 

Lisa Fink, RWT Staff

November 04, 2010

The link to the video has been fixed.

 

Rose

October 21, 2010

I think this is a great lesson... but I wish you had fixed the link as you indicated in January. The video link to Ball State University does not work.

 

Carol

September 27, 2010

I would also love to have an answer sheet for the "Identifying Plagiarism" worksheets - just to make sure I am teaching this properly. Is there any chance of getting the correct answers?

 

Lisa Fink, RWT Staff

January 14, 2010

Thank you for writing to ReadWriteThink.org.

Some of ReadWriteThink.org's lessons contain answer keys, but some do not. In this case, we chose not to publish an answer key for this resource to allow teachers the opportunity to treat it as an inquiry projects. If a particular answer is hard to find, the teacher and student can research it together.

We will also work to fix the broken link.

 

Jenni

January 11, 2010

I wish this lesson had included the answers or rules used to decide on plagiarism with the Identifying Plagiarism worksheet. This lesson would be a lot more useful then! Also, the link to the Plagiarism handout isn't working.

 

 

  • Post a Comment

Have you tried this lesson? If so, what worked well for you? Did you make any changes? Do you have different resources to recommend? Share your thoughts here.

*

 

*

E-mail will not be published with comments.

 

*

 

*


characters remaining 5000

 

*

To help us eliminate spam messages,
please type the characters shown in the image.

 

 

 

  • Send Us Feedback

We are always working to improve our content. Please contact us to share your thoughts about this lesson plan, including any concerns or suggestions.