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Lesson Plan

Peace Poems and Picasso Doves: Literature, Art, Technology, and Poetry

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Peace Poems and Picasso Doves: Literature, Art, Technology, and Poetry

Grades 3 – 5
Lesson Plan Type Unit
Estimated Time Nine and a half hours, plus publishing time
Lesson Author

Judi Moreillon

Judi Moreillon

Tucson, Arizona

Publisher

International Reading Association

 

Overview

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

 

OVERVIEW

This lesson supports third- through fifth-grade students as they apply think-aloud strategies to reading, as well as to the composition of artwork and poetry. Activities include collaborative as well as individual work. Technology tools are integrated as students research symbols of peace and as they prewrite, compose, and publish their poetry.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

  • Diamante Poems: Students will use this interactive tool to write their peace poem in diamante form.

  • Acrostic Poems: Students will use this interactive tool to write their peace poem in acrostic form.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Oster, L. (2001). Using the think-aloud for reading instruction. The Reading Teacher, 55, 64-69.

  • The think-aloud technique (e.g., questioning, accessing prior knowledge, and making inferences or predictions) helps students recognize the strategies they are using to understand a text.

  • Teachers can use students' personal reactions to a text as a basis for writing assignments that extend understanding through critical and creative thinking.

 

Roberts, S.K. (2002). Taking a technological path to poetry prewriting. The Reading Teacher, 55, 678687.

  • The goal of prewriting is to rehearse or try out a quantity of ideas. Therefore, using technology for prewriting activities makes sense because students using word processors write more than students using pen and paper.

  • Technology can engage learners in an interactive and motivating manner that enhances poetry writing.

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