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Activity

Design a Travel Brochure

 

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Design a Travel Brochure

Grades 6 – 8
Activity Time About an hour
Activity Author

Lisa Storm Fink

Lisa Storm Fink

Urbana, Illinois

 
Publisher National Council of Teachers of English
 

What You Need

Here's What To Do

More Ideas To Try

Glossary

 

What You Need

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Here's What To Do

  1. Ask the children and teens to share their travel stories:

    • Where did they go?
    • How did they decide to go to these places?
    • What were their favorite moments in their travels?
    • What was the best place to eat?  The best place to stay?  The activity that was the most fun? 
  2. If the teens and children haven't traveled recently, ask them if there are places they would like to go.
    • Why would they want to go to that place?
    • What do they know about it already?
    • What would they want to know before they go?
    • Where would they look for that information?
  3. Learn about what makes a successful travel brochure. Collect travel brochures from travel agents, the local chamber of commerce, or a near-by convention and visitor's bureau. Or, together, you can look online at some travel examples:

    • Notes From the Road: This site offers photos, maps, and narratives on places all over North and Central America.
  4. Examine them together.

    • Are there maps? photos? diagrams? other illustrations?
    • What kind of language and vocabulary is used?
    • How is text presented? paragraphs? bulleted lists?
    • Are there specific places highlighted? What kind?
  5. Once they have looked, ask them to return to the list they developed in Step 1:  What additional information do they need to make a useful travel brochure?  Ask them to think about these questions:

    • Who is your audience for this brochure? What is your purpose? (Is it to convince your parents to take you on a trip?  Is it to share with your grandparents so they can learn about your adventure?  Is it for your neighbors to help them if they decide to go to the same place?  Is it for yourself, so that you can keep a vivid memory of your trip?)
    • What qualities of a brochure (maps, diagrams, photos, bulleted lists, etc.) would help you create a brochure that will be useful for your audience?
  6. Once they have looked at the travel brochures, invite them to make one of their own.  To help guide them in what needs to be included, share the Things to Include in a Travel Brochure Handout.
  7. When they are ready to create their travel brochure, children and teens can do it online using the Printing Press or using a folded piece of paper.
    • To help them have a better idea of what the brochure can look like, share an example with them.
  8. Assist the children and teens as they work on the project.

    • As they're making lists of the details of their trip, ask questions about the places, people, experiences they've had.  Asking these questions can help children and teens dig deeply into the memories.
    • As they're turning the ideas into a brochure, point out the spots you enjoy and   the moments that really help you picture the vacation spot.
    • Take a look at the format, sentence structure, vocabulary, photographs, maps.  Does it sound and look like the sample travel brochures you looked at?  Point out to the child/teen the spots where you are confused or have questions.

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More Ideas To Try

  • Create a brochure for all of the places visited on a trip or vacation, or make one for a place yet to be visited.
  • Instead of making a travel brochure about a special place, children can design a postcard highlighting one of the locations they have visited. Postcards can be published using the Postcard Creator. See the Postcard Creator Tool page for additional information on using this interactive tool.
  • As part of your research, watch an online video from MeetMeAtTheCorner.org, such as this virtual field trip to the Empire State Building in New York City. Or, using the video content on the site as a model, make a video of your own to accompany your brochure.

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Glossary

Research

 

Researching a topic or question can take many different forms, from year-long studies resulting in publication to a quick search of available resources on the Internet. For these activities, we refer to research in the informal sense, using readily available resources (Internet, magazines, books, interviews, etc.) to answer questions.

Audience

 

The person or group of people that the message of a piece of writing is meant for. Most pieces of writing have more than one audience.

Purpose

 

The reason or goal someone has for writing a particular text. Common reasons for writing include to express feelings or ideas, to convince someone to believe something, and to provide someone information or instructions. The purpose will often determine the choices the writer makes about how and what to write.

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