Standard Lesson

Exploring Compare and Contrast Structure in Expository Texts

Grades
3 - 5
Lesson Plan Type
Standard Lesson
Estimated Time
Four 45- to 60-minute sessions
Publisher
ILA
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Overview

This lesson focuses on identifying and analyzing the compare and contrast text structure within expository texts. First, students are introduced to the terms compare and contrast and asked to find similarities and differences between two common items. Next, students work in small groups to identify texts that are comparing and contrasting information. Students are then introduced to the Venn diagram as a tool that demonstrates similarities and differences and aids in learning new material.

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

  • By learning to identify and use specific strategies for reading, students will be able to read and study more quickly and effectively.

  • Introducing graphic organizers, such as a Venn diagram, can help students see a picture of the ideas and their relationships, which will help them remember the information being presented.

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 1. Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  • 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).
  • 6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.
  • 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

Materials and Technology

Printouts

Preparation

1. Create small, heterogeneous groups and prepare one compare and contrast index card for each group. On each card, write the names of two items that can be compared (e.g., "motorcycle/bicycle," or "clock/watch").

2. Print and make copies of the Paragraph Practice sheets, Compare and Contrast Tool Kit, and Venn Diagram Rubric.

3. Bookmark and preview the Nests and Houses PowerPoint presentation and online Comparison and Contrast Guide on your classroom computer. Reserve an LCD projector if you don’t have one in your classroom to show the Nests and Houses presentation or print and make copies of the slides for your students.

4. Select and print copies of a compare and contrast paragraph or article from your science or social studies curriculum for each student. You may also select an article from the Internet Articles Written in the Compare and Contrast Format list.

5. Make plans to support your struggling readers by doing any of the following:
  • Make audio recordings of the compare and contrast paragraphs for students.

  • Meet with them in a guided reading group to read the paragraphs before they work with their small group.

  • Pair them with an adult or trusted peer in class to practice reading the paragraphs.

Student Objectives

Students will

  • Build their understanding of the terms compare and contrast by participating in class discussions and by using Internet resources such as the Comparison and Contrast Guide

  • Work collaboratively to identify similarities and differences among subject matter

  • Examine curriculum-based text to compare and contrast ideas

  • Demonstrate understanding of the compare and contrast strategy by visually representing information in a Venn diagram

Session 1: Understanding Compare and Contrast

1. Write the words house and nest on the board or chart paper. Make two columns and label the column on the left Compare (same) and the column on the right Contrast (different). If possible, have a picture of a house and a nest to support your English-language learning (ELL) students.

2. Have students express all of the similarities and differences between these two shelters and write them on the chart in the appropriate column. Your class chart may resemble the chart below:

Compare (same)

Contrast (different)

Both are shelters. Nests are usually smaller than houses; houses are bigger than nests.
Birds make their nests just like humans make their homes. A house has a roof.


Both use trees. Humans use lumber from trees; birds use twigs and branches. A nest is a place for the bird to lay an egg.

Both can shelter more than one inhabitant. Nests are simple; houses are more complex.
Both take up space. Houses usually have more than one room in them.
Both have to be taken care of. Birds might repair a hole; humans might repair a leak. A bird can live in a house as a pet; humans don’t live in nests as pets.
3. Discuss the terms compare and contrast. ReadWriteThink’s Comparison and Contrast Guide can be used to help explain these terms. View the online guide using an LCD projector or gather your students around the classroom computer. The first nine slides of the Comparison and Contrast Guide – encompassing the Overview, Definition, and Example tabs – are most appropriate for this discussion.

4. After sharing the Comparison and Contrast Guide, explain to students that they are going to compare and contrast items in cooperative groups. Divide the class into small groups and give each group a sheet of paper and one index card that you prepared in advance (see Preparation, Step 1). If possible have pictures or the actual objects named on the index cards available for students who need extra support. Instruct groups to draw two columns on the paper and write the words Compare (same) on top of the left-hand column and Contrast (different) on top of the right-hand column. Refer to the chart you just completed with the class as a model.

5. Explain to students that they will now list all of the characteristics that are the same about the items and all of the characteristics that are different.

6. Have students present their lists to the class. Allow students in other groups to suggest additions and changes to the lists.

Session 2: Identifying Texts that Compare and Contrast Items

1. Review the meaning of the terms compare and contrast.

2. Give each student a Compare and Contrast Tool Kit. Read through the worksheet with students and explain how they can use clue words to find the ideas and facts that two items have in common as well as those ideas and facts that are unique to each item. Comparison clue words include similar, both, and alike; contrast clue words include different, but, and instead of. Have students brainstorm other words that are used to express things that are similar or different.

3. On an LCD projector, project the Nests and Houses PowerPoint presentation for students to view, or distribute copies of the slides (see Preparation, Step 3). Read the paragraph aloud to your class, stopping throughout to think aloud. Modeling your thinking will provide the support that your struggling readers need. For example, while reading the paragraph you might share thoughts like the following:
  • “The first sentence says that there are major differences between houses and nests. The way that the sentence is worded makes me think that this paragraph is going to contrast houses and nests.”

  • “Here, it says that you might be surprised that houses and nests have some things that are the same. The way the author uses “same” in that sentence makes me think that this next part will tell me some things that are the same about nests and houses.”
4. After reading the paragraph on Slide 2, go to Slide 3 and follow the directions. This involves locating keywords that signal that the paragraph is organized in a compare and contrast format. Ask students to use their Compare and Contrast Tool Kit to help remember what the clue words are. Students can check their work on Slide 4; the clue words are highlighted within the paragraph.

5. Now that your students have practiced working through a paragraph together, tell them that they are going to work in small groups to practice identifying compare and contrast paragraphs. Divide the class into small groups and distribute copies of the four Paragraph Practice sheets. Have students read the text independently, then work with their groups to answer the questions below each paragraph. Remind students to use their Compare and Contrast Tool Kit as a guide.

Note: Take time before this session to read these paragraphs with your struggling and ELL students. Discuss the content, show photographs of the different houses discussed in each paragraph, and try to build their background knowledge before they read in their small groups. Taking time to build background knowledge will allow your struggling and ELL students to focus on the compare and contrast structure when working with their small groups.

6. Circulate among the groups as they work, focus discussions as needed, and make notes of groups that are able to identify compare and contrast paragraphs and groups that are having difficulty doing this.

7. Once all the small groups have had time to read and discuss the paragraphs, lead a class discussion about the four paragraphs and students’ use of clue words to locate comparing and contrasting information. Also ask students if there are any new clue words that should be added to the Compare and Contrast Tool Kit.

Session 3: Comparing and Contrasting Items Within a Text

1. Review the Compare and Contrast Tool Kit by reading through it and asking students to give examples of how the clue words were used in the paragraphs they read in the previous session.

2. Have students reconvene in their small groups to locate the compare and contrast information within a larger text selection. Distribute copies of the compare and contrast text that you would like them to read. This text can come from your own textbooks or from these suggested Internet Articles Written in the Compare and Contrast Format. Have students read the text independently and then work with their groups to create a list of the ideas and facts that are being compared and contrasted. Pair students who need extra support in reading with a student or adult or provide a recording of the text selection on tape.

3. Remind small groups to use their Compare and Contrast Tool Kit for reference. Circulate among the groups as they work, focus discussions as needed, and observe group interactions using the Group Skills Tracking Sheet.

4. After small groups have had time to read and generate their list of ideas and facts, gather the class together for a whole-group discussion. Ask groups to present their list to the class and explain what the author was comparing and contrasting. Challenge groups to prove their thinking by supporting their thoughts with evidence (such as clue words) from the text.

Session 4: Creating a Venn Diagram

1. Review the similarities and differences from the texts students read during Session 3. Explain that there is another way to show comparing and contrasting ideas.

2. Draw two overlapping circles (a Venn diagram) on the board or chart paper. Ask if anyone knows what kind of diagram it is. Explain that Venn diagrams are useful when comparing and contrasting two subjects, two places, two things, or even two people.

3. Explain that the outer circles are intended for contrasting information; that is, the ideas and facts that are different about or unique to each item. The middle area where the circles overlap is reserved for comparisons; the ideas and facts that the two items have in common.

4. Recall your discussion during Session 1 about the similarities and differences between nests and houses. Label one outer circle of your Venn diagram nests, the other outer circle houses, and the overlapping circle both. Ask students to help you decide where various statements about the two shelters belong on the Venn diagram.

5. Ask students to reconvene in their small groups from the previous session and create a Venn diagram using ideas from the compare and contrast selection that they read. Students may use the online Venn Diagram, the Venn Diagram mobile app, or the Venn Diagram, 2 Circles. Share the Venn Diagram Rubric with students to set expectations for their work.

Note: If students have not used the Venn Diagram tool before, take time to model how it is used. In addition, if you would like all your groups to use the interactive Venn Diagram, you will need to either arrange a computer lab time or a rotating schedule for groups to use classroom computers.

6. When all Venn diagrams have been completed, have each group share their diagram with the class. Ask the other groups if they heard a comparison or contrast that they had not included on their own Venn diagram. Permit students to add any new comparisons or contrasts to their own Venn diagrams.

7. After everyone has finished sharing, discuss with the class how the Compare and Contrast Tool Kit and the Venn diagram can help them while they are reading their textbooks in other subjects. The Tool Kit is a resource they can use to help them figure out the author’s purpose and the Venn diagram is a tool they can use to help them organize the information.

8. Decide as a class how students want to remember the information they learned about comparing, contrasting, and Venn diagrams. They may choose to create an anchor chart to hang up in the classroom for reference or keep their Compare and Contrast Tool Kit and Venn diagram in a folder or notebook that they have regular access to. Encourage them to use these tools while reading nonfiction texts in other subject areas or even during independent reading time.

Extensions

  • Follow up this lesson with another ReadWriteThink lesson, “Teaching the Compare and Contrast Essay through Modeling.”

  • Have students use the Compare & Contrast Map to plan an essay about the similarities and differences between different kinds of homes.

  • Have students use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast character traits from a story or article read in class.

  • Ask students to interview a friend or family member who has lived in the same neighborhood for a long period of time and write a paragraph expressing what has changed and what has stayed the same in the community. They can then create a Venn diagram entitled "My Neighborhood: Then and Now."

Student Assessment / Reflections

  • Use the Venn Diagram Rubric to guide your instruction and as an indicator for which students have a strong grasp of the compare and contrast strategy and which students need further instruction. If possible, continue practicing this strategy with students who need more support until they are able to independently read a compare and contrast article and create a Venn diagram. The Internet Articles Written in the Compare and Contrast Format list provides compare and contrast articles for extra practice.

  • Observe students during class discussions. Closely monitor students who do not share during whole-class discussions. Find a time to conference with them one-on-one or to observe them while they are working independently and in groups to make sure that they understand the concepts discussed in class.

  • The Group Skills Tracking Sheet can help guide your observations while students are working with partners, in groups, or independently. Use your checklist to help form small groups for extra instruction or to identify students who need remediation or modification.
Sylvia Ellis
K-12 Teacher
I had not tried this particular lesson, However,what I found most interesting as I implemented this lesson plan was some of my students were having difficulting showing a relationship between the words, compare and contrast. As I contiuned with this lesson I used clue words on my chart and they immediately began to comprehend the text structure. I also found the Group Skill Tracking Sheet to be helpful with keeping my students focused and on task. I did make a change with the definition . Insetead of comparing and contracting the words nest and house, I used the words boy and girl and different and similar.
Kevin Swain
K-12 Teacher
I would like some information in teaching children that are severely handicapped how to compare and contrast texts and if their lesson plans or if there is a extra web site that I could use please let me know.
Sylvia Ellis
K-12 Teacher
No I haven’t used this lesson plan. However, what I found most interesting was the way my students comprehended their text structure. Some of my students were struggling comparing and contrasting the chosen vocabulary word. Once I used clue words they immediately comprehended each word. My students also preferred using the words difference and similar. I used different vocabulary words to compare and contrast the two words. I also used other words, such as, boy and girl with the same procedures. The Group Skill Tracking Sheet was also helpful with keeping my students on task and focused. This was an exciting lesson to help with the development of my students reading comprehension.
Jo Beth Moses
K-12 Teacher
I think this lesson will be great I have not tried this but I will for sure do so. I believe that my students will enjoy this and will learn how to compare and contrast. It will help my student brainstrom and increase their thinking skills to come up with how things are different and alike. I will be doing this with my students with many different words.
Julie Margenthaler
K-12 Teacher
I loved how you used different types of graphic organizers, cooperative learning and technology.
Amy Cavness
K-12 Teacher
I really like how this lesson covers all areas of learning. The students have individual and group learning and they learn in different ways, such as internet, class discussions, visually, and on paper. There are many ways for each individual student to understand the concept of compare and contrast. She reminds us to read over the paragraphs in the Paragraph Practice worksheet to help the struggling and ELL students.
I like how she mentions at the end of the lesson to decide as a class how everyone wants to remember the information they learned about compare and contrast and Venn diagrams. This is encouraging them to continue using the tools they learned from this lesson.
CoCo Reed
Preservice Teacher
Thought this was a good plan, have not had the chance to try it and I dont think I would make any changes to it.
Sherri Shirrell
K-12 Teacher
I found this to be a very good lesson plan on the Compare and Contrast Text Structure. Each session was very well laid out in a step by step process. The forms/handouts were clearly defined for each task. I especially liked the Venn Diagram and the Compare and Contrast Tool Kit, which I think are both very useful tools. The Comparison and Contrast Guide is also a very useful link, with all of the resources and examples within it. I would definitely use this as a guide for a similar lesson plan.
Matt Ball
K-12 Teacher
This is an excellent lesson for teaching reading comprehension. The techniques of compare and contrast is important because it challenges the students to have a real understanding of what they are reading. So many of my students struggle with compare and contrast question. I really liked the idea of using a venn diagram as a teaching technique.
Julie Kennedy
K-12 Teacher
This is an excellent lesson plan. I like the ideas presented of using small groups and the whole class to help compare and contrast in the text they are reading. It helps each student individually, but allows the full class to gain from one another where a student may have missed the main ideas of the session.
Shirley
K-12 Teacher
Will try this lesson
Susan Kays
K-12 Teacher
I attempted to print out the lesson plan and resources, including the Venn diagram and had difficulties. The print of the lesson plan was scrunched up, so that some lines were difficult to read. Additionally, the Venn diagram "printable" was not in a format that my Word 2007 could read, in spite of the Windows default. I am disappointed, as I had hoped to use this lesson for presentation in my master's class.
sk
Rebekah M
Preservice Teacher
Thank you so much for this lesson!! It is aligned to Common Core RI.3.8 and has worked perfectly for my students.
Haley Rasmusson
Preservice Teacher
I am student teaching and I was looking for a lesson to do with my second graders that would keep them engaged during their literacy time. This is a great lesson plan that I think my children will definitely enjoy and be able to follow along with and learn from it.
Colleen Hunt
K-12 Teacher
I am looking for resources to recommend to colleagues, and to use in my fourth grade classroom. I am experiencing downloading and printing issues, as well as re-format issues, making it difficult for me to reasonably use the resources. The overall lesson plan is very sound, though. I will recommend it, in the hopes that you will be able to work out some of the download challenges.
Rob
K-12 Teacher
The tracking skills form is damaged and will not open. Can yo please replace it or tell me where else I can get it?
Rebekah M
Preservice Teacher
Thank you so much for this lesson!! It is aligned to Common Core RI.3.8 and has worked perfectly for my students.
Jo Beth Moses
K-12 Teacher
I have not used this lesson but I have found that this is an excellent lesson. I will be using this lesson for my students. Some of my student have trouble comparing and contrasting. The activities of this lesson will help these students understand what they are reading/ and help them brianstorm. The different diagrams and grahphics will help them understand also. I like this lesson.
Brandi Killian
K-12 Teacher
I enjoyed analyzing this lesson plan. I loved how the lesson plan provided several different sessions and each session provided a different way of teaching the concept of compare and contrast. This I believe is very beneficial in keeping the students engaged. I also liked how the lesson plan had small group work and individual work. Compare and contrast can be a hard topic for students to grasp, but this lesson plan provided several hands on ways to teach this topic that I was able to implement in my classroom.
Kaylee Olney, RWT Staff
Administrator
Hi Rob, You're probably experiencing technical difficulties with the PDF links because you don't have the latest version of Adobe Acrobat Reader on your computer. You can download it for free by clicking the red Acrobat Reader icon button on our Site Tools page: http://www.readwritethink.org/util/help.html.

If you find that you do have the latest version of Acrobat Reader, a communication problem between Internet Explorer 8 and Acrobat Reader 9 may be to blame. If you're working on a PC/Windows computer, you can download a security patch at http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com that should solve the problem. Another option would be to use the Firefox browser on your PC since the PDFs show up fine in that browser. You can download Firefox free at http://www.mozilla.com/firefox. Please contact us if that doesn't solve your problem so that we may investigate further.
Christy Bridges
K-12 Teacher
This lesson plan was very detailed and great for a teacher such as myself who is obtaining alternative certification and have not received formal lesson plan "training." I am excited to use this lesson plan with some of my students and am positive it will be successful and beneficial for them all. I am grateful for the explicit details and examples (as previously stated) and feel confident in myself in teaching it. Thank you!
stephanie
K-12 Teacher
This lesson is wonderful on so many different levels. The students learn individually and in groups and also use so many different resources of technology and graphic organizers to learn the concept of how to compare and contrast. The Venn diagram is a great technique to use to teach this lesson as well. I really like how the lesson is very well organized and clearly written in a sequenced process that is easy to understand by educators to teach and students to learn.
Haley Rasmusson
Preservice Teacher
I am student teaching and I was looking for a lesson to do with my second graders that would keep them engaged during their literacy time. This is a great lesson plan that I think my children will definitely enjoy and be able to follow along with and learn from it.
Bobbie Delozier
K-12 Teacher
This is a wonderful lesson plan that touches on so many different ways of teaching Compare and Contrast. I think the Compare and Contrast tool kit along with the Venn diagram will help students who are visual learners understand the concept much better then simply discussing the text. This lesson plan teaches several different ways which is great because students learn in different ways.
Heather Lipps
K-12 Teacher
I thought this lesson plan was an excellent way to introduce compare and contrast to students. I thought this lesson plan could be used not only in Language Arts, but also in other subjects. At the school I teach at, cooperative learning is a huge focus for all of our classrooms. I teach Special Education, but I can see how I could easily adapt this lesson plan to make it work perfect for my students. The opportunity for the students to do cooperative learning, allows them to share their ideas with their classmates and strengthens their understanding of what comparing and contrasting means. I also thought the lesson plan was awesome because it allowed the teacher to teach the children about comparison clue words. I am looking forward to trying this lesson with my students.
cd
K-12 Teacher
This is an awesome lesson. My students enjoyed it and learned from it.
Tammy
K-12 Teacher
This a great lesson plan. It is very detailed and easy to follow. I believe that it would be an effective lesson to teach to my middle school students. Compare and Contrast is important to the understanding and comprehending of the material being read. I plan on using this lesson plan in my class.
Lindsay Rhodes
Preservice Teacher
I thought this article gave a few good activities to help students understand more about compare and contrast and apply their knowledge to the activities. When I was in school, the only way my teachers had me learn compare and contrast was using Venn Diagrams. These diagrams did help me, but I was never exposed to other activities/strategies for helping me with compare and contrast. I thought all of the activities (even the Venn Diagram activity) were helpful for the students in better understanding the terms compare and contrasts. The activities provided a variety of strategies for students with different learning styles.
Brandie Klinkhardt
K-12 Teacher
I have not used this lesson plan, but would like to use this one in the furture with my students. THis lesson plan appears to spread out teaching comparisons and contrasting in a way that students can easily grasp the concept. I like that this lesson plan starts out with doing a chart with the students, then asking them to get into groups to try it on their own. This lesson plan uses a variety of teaching styles which I find very important when teaching. All students do not learn in the same way. I also found it interesting that this lesson teaches the students cue words to look for when comparing and contrasting. This makes it easier and gives the students a model so to speak.
Weldon Brown
K-12 Teacher
I found this article very interesting and informative. Understanding compare and contrast is very improtant in the success of readers. Being able to compare and contrast, helps readers be able to get more out of what he or she is reading. The Venn Diagram, I believe can be very helpful in the classroom. Applying the Venn Diagram will help studnets with understanding compare and cntrast concepts.
Weldon Brown
K-12 Teacher
I found this article very interesting and informative. Understanding compare and contrast is very improtant in the success of readers. Being able to compare and contrast, helps readers be able to get more out of what he or she is reading. The Venn Diagram, I believe can be very helpful in the classroom. Applying the Venn Diagram will help studnets with understanding compare and cntrast concepts.
Maureen Gambino
K-12 Teacher
I found the materials to be very helpful in creating a 2nd grade lesson aligned to the CCLS. The rubrics are a great resource as well. I feel that students should be able to use a venn diagram to compare and contrast but I have also seen a "Tophat" compare/contrast graphic organizer which is easier for the students to write their details in. The "Tophat" GO has been on some state tests as well. Students need to be taught to organize their details in many ways.
Kat Cooke
K-12 Teacher
Emily,
I am a 29 yr. EC teacher in an Elementary School. I was searching for something to teach compare and contrast to my 5th gr. EC students for a formal observation. I googled "compare contrast lesson plans" and it brought me to this site. I absolutely love your lessoon plan and shared it with all the 5th grade teachers in my school...they also LOVED it. Thanks for sharing....you must be an awesome teacher! My kids loved it and understood the concept and felt great being successful with the activities linked in your plan.
Katie
K-12 Teacher
Really great lesson plan. The steps provided for excellent reinforcement as students added new knowledge to old. I also appreciated the emphasis on group learning and practice.
Sylvia Ellis
K-12 Teacher
I had not tried this particular lesson, However,what I found most interesting as I implemented this lesson plan was some of my students were having difficulting showing a relationship between the words, compare and contrast. As I contiuned with this lesson I used clue words on my chart and they immediately began to comprehend the text structure. I also found the Group Skill Tracking Sheet to be helpful with keeping my students focused and on task. I did make a change with the definition . Insetead of comparing and contracting the words nest and house, I used the words boy and girl and different and similar.
Kevin Swain
K-12 Teacher
I would like some information in teaching children that are severely handicapped how to compare and contrast texts and if their lesson plans or if there is a extra web site that I could use please let me know.
Sylvia Ellis
K-12 Teacher
No I haven’t used this lesson plan. However, what I found most interesting was the way my students comprehended their text structure. Some of my students were struggling comparing and contrasting the chosen vocabulary word. Once I used clue words they immediately comprehended each word. My students also preferred using the words difference and similar. I used different vocabulary words to compare and contrast the two words. I also used other words, such as, boy and girl with the same procedures. The Group Skill Tracking Sheet was also helpful with keeping my students on task and focused. This was an exciting lesson to help with the development of my students reading comprehension.
Jo Beth Moses
K-12 Teacher
I think this lesson will be great I have not tried this but I will for sure do so. I believe that my students will enjoy this and will learn how to compare and contrast. It will help my student brainstrom and increase their thinking skills to come up with how things are different and alike. I will be doing this with my students with many different words.
Julie Margenthaler
K-12 Teacher
I loved how you used different types of graphic organizers, cooperative learning and technology.
Amy Cavness
K-12 Teacher
I really like how this lesson covers all areas of learning. The students have individual and group learning and they learn in different ways, such as internet, class discussions, visually, and on paper. There are many ways for each individual student to understand the concept of compare and contrast. She reminds us to read over the paragraphs in the Paragraph Practice worksheet to help the struggling and ELL students.
I like how she mentions at the end of the lesson to decide as a class how everyone wants to remember the information they learned about compare and contrast and Venn diagrams. This is encouraging them to continue using the tools they learned from this lesson.
CoCo Reed
Preservice Teacher
Thought this was a good plan, have not had the chance to try it and I dont think I would make any changes to it.
Sherri Shirrell
K-12 Teacher
I found this to be a very good lesson plan on the Compare and Contrast Text Structure. Each session was very well laid out in a step by step process. The forms/handouts were clearly defined for each task. I especially liked the Venn Diagram and the Compare and Contrast Tool Kit, which I think are both very useful tools. The Comparison and Contrast Guide is also a very useful link, with all of the resources and examples within it. I would definitely use this as a guide for a similar lesson plan.
Matt Ball
K-12 Teacher
This is an excellent lesson for teaching reading comprehension. The techniques of compare and contrast is important because it challenges the students to have a real understanding of what they are reading. So many of my students struggle with compare and contrast question. I really liked the idea of using a venn diagram as a teaching technique.
Julie Kennedy
K-12 Teacher
This is an excellent lesson plan. I like the ideas presented of using small groups and the whole class to help compare and contrast in the text they are reading. It helps each student individually, but allows the full class to gain from one another where a student may have missed the main ideas of the session.
Shirley
K-12 Teacher
Will try this lesson
Susan Kays
K-12 Teacher
I attempted to print out the lesson plan and resources, including the Venn diagram and had difficulties. The print of the lesson plan was scrunched up, so that some lines were difficult to read. Additionally, the Venn diagram "printable" was not in a format that my Word 2007 could read, in spite of the Windows default. I am disappointed, as I had hoped to use this lesson for presentation in my master's class.
sk
Susan Kays
K-12 Teacher
I attempted to print out the lesson plan and resources, including the Venn diagram and had difficulties. The print of the lesson plan was scrunched up, so that some lines were difficult to read. Additionally, the Venn diagram "printable" was not in a format that my Word 2007 could read, in spite of the Windows default. I am disappointed, as I had hoped to use this lesson for presentation in my master's class.
sk
Rebekah M
Preservice Teacher
Thank you so much for this lesson!! It is aligned to Common Core RI.3.8 and has worked perfectly for my students.
Haley Rasmusson
Preservice Teacher
I am student teaching and I was looking for a lesson to do with my second graders that would keep them engaged during their literacy time. This is a great lesson plan that I think my children will definitely enjoy and be able to follow along with and learn from it.
Colleen Hunt
K-12 Teacher
I am looking for resources to recommend to colleagues, and to use in my fourth grade classroom. I am experiencing downloading and printing issues, as well as re-format issues, making it difficult for me to reasonably use the resources. The overall lesson plan is very sound, though. I will recommend it, in the hopes that you will be able to work out some of the download challenges.

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