Unit

Creating a Classroom Newspaper

Grades
3 - 5
Lesson Plan Type
Unit
Estimated Time
Ten 50-minute sessions
Publisher
ILA
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Overview

Students will enjoy this creative, exciting, and stimulating lesson in writing as they create authentic newspaper stories. As they are transformed into reporters and editors, they will become effective users of ICT in order to publish their own classroom newspaper. Various aspects of newspapers are covered, including parts of a newspaper, writing an article, online newspapers, newspaper reading habits, and layout and design techniques.

Featured Resources

From Theory to Practice

  • Encouraging children to read and write in ways that allow them to make sense of real language in real contexts is more likely to help them develop the skills necessary to become fluent readers and writers. Creation of a class newspaper provides such a real context, and thus makes an excellent choice as the basis for a project designed with this goal in mind.

  • Use of the computer motivates students to learn and students' attitudes toward the newspaper genre are affected by active participation in the production of an authentic and original newspaper of their own.

  • Abilities in formal writing are best developed with a "process approach" that goes through five distinct phases: prewriting, composing or drafting, revising, editing, and publishing. Using this approach helps students more fully understand the process of producing formal written documents, such as magazines and newspapers.

 

Common Core Standards

This resource has been aligned to the Common Core State Standards for states in which they have been adopted. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, CCSS alignments are forthcoming.

State Standards

This lesson has been aligned to standards in the following states. If a state does not appear in the drop-down, standard alignments are not currently available for that state.

NCTE/IRA National Standards for the English Language Arts

  • 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
  • 5. Students employ a wide range of strategies as they write and use different writing process elements appropriately to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.
  • 6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.
  • 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.
  • 11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

Materials and Technology

  • Computer lab with Internet access

  • Multimedia software

  • Access to a library of images/graphics

  • Scanner (optional)

  • Digital camera (optional)

  • Deadline! From News to Newspaper by Gail Gibbons (HarperCollins, 1987)

  • The Furry News: How to Make a Newspaper by Loreen Leedy (Holiday House, 1993)

  • Freddy and the Bean Home News by Walter R. Brooks (Puffin, 2002)

Printouts

Websites

Preparation

*Prerequisite skills: Familiarization with an appropriate multimedia software program

1. Review and bookmark sample of classroom newsletters from Websites list. Review and bookmark the Internet Public Library website.

2. Obtain copies of books from Materials and Technology list, and secure copies of local, state, and/or national newspapers (at least 6-8).

3. Access the Grandview Newspaper lesson plan, and print a copy of the "Bad Fall Injures Children" news article.

4. Make an overhead of Inverted Pyramid Format and Reporting Tips sheet

5. Make student copies of Newspaper Story Format sheet, Story Feedback Form, Reporter's Guide handout, and Newspaper Writing Assessment sheet.

Student Objectives

Students will

  • Identify the parts of a newspaper

  • Identify the format of a news article

  • Write a newspaper story

  • Edit newspaper articles

  • Use ICT equipment and software

  • Layout and publish a classroom newspaper

Session 1

Hold up a sample front page from a selected newspaper. Ask students what they notice about the format that is different from other texts they read (e.g., black and white ink, graphics, headline, column format).

Divide the students into groups of three to four members. Explain to the students that they will explore a newspaper, paying attention to the layout and format. Instruct students to study the front page first and discuss what different parts they notice.

Ask each group to report back to the whole class what members noticed was contained on the front page. Make a list of parts on the board. (e.g., title, headlines, pictures or graphics, captions, date, subtitles, table of contents/index, etc.). Students should notice similarities between different newspapers.

Discuss with the class how newspapers use a standard format.

In their groups, have students continue to explore copies of newspapers. What kinds of things do they notice? Students should begin to identify sections and features that are specific to newspapers. Have the groups again report to the whole class what types of items they noticed in their paper. Continue keeping the list of items on the board. (Additional items may include: editorials, cartoons, horoscope, local news, weddings, classifieds, advertising, etc.)

Explain to the class that people read newspapers differently than other types of texts. Discuss how people read newspapers. Reading a newspaper matches people's interests in certain things. They scan headlines, subtitles, and images to see if the story interests them or not.

Read some sample headlines from newspapers. Ask, "How many of you would be interested in reading this story?"

For homework, have students ask their family members what newspapers they read regularly and what sections they read most often. Give an example of your own newspaper reading habits. (For example, "First I check the weather to help me decide what to wear to school. Then I go to the local news to see what is happening in my town. Finally, I scan the headlines to see what is happening in the world. If I have time, I start the crossword puzzle.")

Session 2

Ask the students to report about their family's newspaper reading habits. Make a list of newspapers that are read and determine which are the most common.

List the words who, what, where, when, and why on the board, overhead, or chart paper. Answer each of the five W questions using the popular rhyme "Jack & Jill."

Example:

  • Who? Jack and Jill

  • What? Fell down and broke crown

  • Where? On the hill

  • When? Sometime in the past

  • Why? Trying to fetch water

Read "Bad Fall Injures Children" article from page 4 of the Grandview Newspaper lesson plan. Students clarify their previous responses to the five Ws according to the article. Explain how these five questions help to summarize a news story.

Put students in groups of three to four members. Ask the students to choose another famous rhyme or fairy tale and answer the five W questions. Have each group read just the answers to their questions, and then have the class try to guess what fairy tale or rhyme it is. Explain that these five Ws help with the organization of a news story and that they make up the most important details of the story.

Demonstrate to the class the organization of a good news story using the Inverted Pyramid Format overhead. Use a sample newspaper story to illustrate an example of this format

For homework, ask students to select a newspaper article that they are interested in reading and bring it to school the next day.

Session 3

Give students time to read the newspaper article they brought from home. Hand out the Newspaper Story Format sheet. Students should then complete the sheet using details from their particular article and share the summary of their newspaper article.

Ask the students to rewrite the newspaper article in their own words as if they were a reporter for their local newspaper. What changes would they make and why?

Have the students share their stories with a classmate using the following questions to guide their discussion:

  • Were changes made to the lead? Why?

  • Were changes made to the five Ws? Why?

  • Were changes made to the details? Why?

As a class, discuss fact versus opinion. Explain that news articles do not include the reporter's opinion. Have students go back and see if the changes that were made to their articles were strictly factual. Refer to original articles as needed for examples of fact-based stories.

Session 4

Read-aloud to the class from one or more of the suggested titles:

  • Deadline! From News to Newspaper by Gail Gibbons

  • The Furry News: How to Make a Newspaper by Loreen Leedy

  • Freddy and the Bean Home News by Walter R. Brooks

Have students brainstorm the types of articles they would like to write and list them on the board. Look at the list and ask students if the articles could be grouped into categories or "newspaper sections."

Use the Reporting Tips overhead to present how to make newspaper articles more interesting. Go over each point and clarify any questions that students may raise.

Group students based on interests to form an "editorial staff" for each newspaper section. Have the groups meet to decide who will write which stories. Students can use the Reporter's Guide handout as a guideline. When they have finished, students can begin collecting facts for their stories.

Session 5 and 6

Take students to the computer lab and have them write their first draft. They should not worry about font, size, or columns at this point. Be sure that they save their work and print a hard copy of their article for editing.

Students' stories should then be self-edited and edited by two other members of their editorial staff (using the Story Feedback Form). Students should make necessary revisions to their stories based on the comments from the Story Feedback Form.

Session 7

In the computer lab, have students access the Internet Public Library website and explore newspapers from around the world. They should pay particular attention to the design and layout elements. For example, some articles may include graphics (e.g., photos, charts, graphs). Discuss what patterns of layout design the students noticed.

As a whole class, discuss newspaper layout, addressing the following points:

  • Headline News: Top priority articles are near the front (1-2 pages). These are typically of high interest to your entire audience of readers (e.g., town news such as a new park or community center). Long front-page articles can be continued on an inside page to provide room for other headline news.

  • Feature Articles: Stories about topics or events that are of interest to a certain group of readers (e.g., sports, animal stories, academic topics, interviews with school staff, book reviews). These are typically grouped into sections.

  • Pictures or graphics: The image should always appear with the story. A caption can be included. The size usually depends on how much space is available in the layout.

Give students the opportunity to explore these layout items in newspapers in the classroom and online. Students should look at the Junior Seahawk Newsletter to get ideas for their own layout.

Session 8 and 9

In the computer lab, students should complete final story revisions. They may then begin the newspaper layout using appropriate software. The ReadWriteThink Printing Press includes an option for creating a newspaper. Each editorial staff works together to complete their newspaper section.

Note: 8 ½ X 11 size pages are optimal. They can be printed and copied back to back on 11 X 17 paper that can be folded like a real newspaper. The completed paper must have an even number of pages for this format.

Pictures can be drawn or pasted into the layout. Depending on the available resources, pictures can also be scanned or downloaded from a digital camera. Tell students to play around with fonts and columns. They should experiment and be creative!

Once pages are completed, they should be printed. The editorial staff should do a final reading for errors. Pages are then submitted to the teacher for publishing.

Session 10

Distribute the class newspaper to the students and allow them time to read it. When they have finished, hand out the Newspaper Writing Assessment sheet and ask them to fill it out.

Extensions

Student Assessment / Reflections

Assess students' comments from the Newspaper Writing Assessment sheet.

Joseph
K-12 Teacher
I also like this resource. I created a rubric using rubistar in order to grade the newspaper articles. Here is the link: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&module=Rubistar&rubric_id=1899035&.
Samantha
Librarian
This souds Good
Joseph
K-12 Teacher
I also like this resource. I created a rubric using rubistar in order to grade the newspaper articles. Here is the link: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&module=Rubistar&rubric_id=1899035&.
Anna
K-12 Teacher
Great organized lesson plans! Thinking about creating a classroom newspaper with 3rd graders. Good way to implement the 5 w's in writing. Really loved the lesson examples for the nursery rhymes.
Fun to learn subject writing news stories. Most of all love the Printing Press interactive for the the children, it's easy to create the finished writing piece
Thank you
Babar Rahim
K-12 Teacher
Great lesson plans with all possible details clearly presented. A real service to the teaching community. Different approaches to different grades was specially helpful.
Cathy Sams
K-12 Teacher
How do you save their work so that they could work on it later? We couldn't get it to save on the computer or on a thumb drive. Help! The kids were really excited about the classroom paper.
Jennifer from Stockholm, Sweden
College/Professor
Excellent genre framework! I'll try these lesson plans out with my EL learners in 7th, 8th and 9th grade.
Mrs. K. Jones
K-12 Teacher
I LOVE IT!!! I showed it this to my students, and they really got the hang of it.I was very surprised that was my fourth time teaching this because they did not understand what to do.NOW THEY DO!!!THANK YOU!!!!
Elia Paredes
K-12 Teacher
Mil gracias,¡ Excelente apoyo!
Lauren
Preservice Teacher
These lesson plans were very detailed and well thought out. I loved having this input while I was creating my own newspaper unit. The only thing I thought was missing was a description of how you graded the student's articles.
habiganj Newspaper
Administrator
YOur post on Creating a Classroom Newspaper
is great habiganjnewspaper.blogspot.com
Babar Rahim
K-12 Teacher
Great lesson plans with all possible details clearly presented. A real service to the teaching community. Different approaches to different grades was specially helpful.
Wes Ford
Associate Editor
Cathy Sams,

At the moment, Printing Press does not have the work saver feature attached to it, and thus students cannot save their work and return to it later. However, Printing Press is currently in redesign, and during the redesign, we hope to have the work saver function added to it!

You can keep track of what is in the works for ReadWriteThink from the editors of the site (though mostly just me) at http://rwteditor.blogspot.com/

Wes Ford
Associate Editor for ReadWriteThink.org
Polly Turner
K-12 Teacher
Thsi is an excellent resource - i am actually going to use this link with a group of yr 10 GCSE Art students who have been covering photojournalism, they have written an imaginary artical about what would happen if all artists were made redundant and taken photographs to document the visual effects of the current gloabl recession on the streets of their city.
Elia Paredes
K-12 Teacher
Mil gracias,¡ Excelente apoyo!
habiganj Newspaper
Administrator
YOur post on Creating a Classroom Newspaper
is great habiganjnewspaper.blogspot.com
Barbara
K-12 Teacher
Thank you so much for your wonderful Lesson plans and great resources!!
Laurie
K-12 Teacher
LOVE this lesson plan! I want to try it with my third graders. I hope it isn't too difficult for them! I too am curious on how you graded the articles.
jkent
K-12 Teacher
Thank you very good resource
Carolina Palacios
K-12 Teacher
Great resources! Extremely helpful.
Samantha
Librarian
This souds Good
Joseph
K-12 Teacher
I also like this resource. I created a rubric using rubistar in order to grade the newspaper articles. Here is the link: http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php?screen=ShowRubric&module=Rubistar&rubric_id=1899035&.
Anna
K-12 Teacher
Great organized lesson plans! Thinking about creating a classroom newspaper with 3rd graders. Good way to implement the 5 w's in writing. Really loved the lesson examples for the nursery rhymes.
Fun to learn subject writing news stories. Most of all love the Printing Press interactive for the the children, it's easy to create the finished writing piece
Thank you
Cathy Sams
K-12 Teacher
How do you save their work so that they could work on it later? We couldn't get it to save on the computer or on a thumb drive. Help! The kids were really excited about the classroom paper.
Jennifer from Stockholm, Sweden
College/Professor
Excellent genre framework! I'll try these lesson plans out with my EL learners in 7th, 8th and 9th grade.
Mrs. K. Jones
K-12 Teacher
I LOVE IT!!! I showed it this to my students, and they really got the hang of it.I was very surprised that was my fourth time teaching this because they did not understand what to do.NOW THEY DO!!!THANK YOU!!!!
Babar Rahim
K-12 Teacher
Great lesson plans with all possible details clearly presented. A real service to the teaching community. Different approaches to different grades was specially helpful.
Lauren
Preservice Teacher
These lesson plans were very detailed and well thought out. I loved having this input while I was creating my own newspaper unit. The only thing I thought was missing was a description of how you graded the student's articles.
Elia Paredes
K-12 Teacher
Mil gracias,¡ Excelente apoyo!
Anna
K-12 Teacher
Great organized lesson plans! Thinking about creating a classroom newspaper with 3rd graders. Good way to implement the 5 w's in writing. Really loved the lesson examples for the nursery rhymes.
Fun to learn subject writing news stories. Most of all love the Printing Press interactive for the the children, it's easy to create the finished writing piece
Thank you
Cathy Sams
K-12 Teacher
How do you save their work so that they could work on it later? We couldn't get it to save on the computer or on a thumb drive. Help! The kids were really excited about the classroom paper.
Wes Ford
Associate Editor
Cathy Sams,

At the moment, Printing Press does not have the work saver feature attached to it, and thus students cannot save their work and return to it later. However, Printing Press is currently in redesign, and during the redesign, we hope to have the work saver function added to it!

You can keep track of what is in the works for ReadWriteThink from the editors of the site (though mostly just me) at http://rwteditor.blogspot.com/

Wes Ford
Associate Editor for ReadWriteThink.org
habiganj Newspaper
Administrator
YOur post on Creating a Classroom Newspaper
is great habiganjnewspaper.blogspot.com
Jennifer from Stockholm, Sweden
College/Professor
Excellent genre framework! I'll try these lesson plans out with my EL learners in 7th, 8th and 9th grade.
Mrs. K. Jones
K-12 Teacher
I LOVE IT!!! I showed it this to my students, and they really got the hang of it.I was very surprised that was my fourth time teaching this because they did not understand what to do.NOW THEY DO!!!THANK YOU!!!!
Polly Turner
K-12 Teacher
Thsi is an excellent resource - i am actually going to use this link with a group of yr 10 GCSE Art students who have been covering photojournalism, they have written an imaginary artical about what would happen if all artists were made redundant and taken photographs to document the visual effects of the current gloabl recession on the streets of their city.
Lauren
Preservice Teacher
These lesson plans were very detailed and well thought out. I loved having this input while I was creating my own newspaper unit. The only thing I thought was missing was a description of how you graded the student's articles.
Wes Ford
Associate Editor
Cathy Sams,

At the moment, Printing Press does not have the work saver feature attached to it, and thus students cannot save their work and return to it later. However, Printing Press is currently in redesign, and during the redesign, we hope to have the work saver function added to it!

You can keep track of what is in the works for ReadWriteThink from the editors of the site (though mostly just me) at http://rwteditor.blogspot.com/

Wes Ford
Associate Editor for ReadWriteThink.org
Barbara
K-12 Teacher
Thank you so much for your wonderful Lesson plans and great resources!!
Polly Turner
K-12 Teacher
Thsi is an excellent resource - i am actually going to use this link with a group of yr 10 GCSE Art students who have been covering photojournalism, they have written an imaginary artical about what would happen if all artists were made redundant and taken photographs to document the visual effects of the current gloabl recession on the streets of their city.
Laurie
K-12 Teacher
LOVE this lesson plan! I want to try it with my third graders. I hope it isn't too difficult for them! I too am curious on how you graded the articles.
Barbara
K-12 Teacher
Thank you so much for your wonderful Lesson plans and great resources!!
jkent
K-12 Teacher
Thank you very good resource
Carolina Palacios
K-12 Teacher
Great resources! Extremely helpful.
Laurie
K-12 Teacher
LOVE this lesson plan! I want to try it with my third graders. I hope it isn't too difficult for them! I too am curious on how you graded the articles.
Samantha
Librarian
This souds Good
jkent
K-12 Teacher
Thank you very good resource
Carolina Palacios
K-12 Teacher
Great resources! Extremely helpful.

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